History

Facts About U.S. Presidents

Facts About U.S. Presidents Want to impress your friends with some obscure facts about US presidents? We’re going through every president from Washington to Trump by listing a little-known fact about each. Enjoy the list! George Washington In an effort to promote an end to slavery, Washington released all 124 slaves he had owned in…

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Women in the American Revolution: 3 Forces Driving Freedom

Women in the American Revolution: 3 Forces Driving Freedom Not all wars are on won on the battlefield. For some, fighting behind the lines signified a greater cost to personal safety, all in the name of liberty and freedom for every soon-to-be American citizen. We know the stories of male greats in the American Revolution…

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The Story of Oedipus

The Story of Oedipus Who is Oedipus Rex? Sophocles, the ancient Greek playwright, created the story of Oedipus in three chapters. Though the most famous of these is the middle chapter, where most of the important action takes place. The story of Oedipus was reinvigorated most recently by Freud, but his legacy lives on in…

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Washington DC Monuments

Washington DC Monuments Unsure of what to see when visiting Washington DC for the first time? Or maybe you want to revisit old favorites. Check out our top four memorials dedicated to important figures of American history. They’re a must-see for any tourist (and local, for that matter)! Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Located at…

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Picasso’s Blue Period: La Vie

Picasso’s Blue Period: La Vie Shades of Blue Though lasting only three years, Pablo Picasso’s Blue Period is recognized as one of his most iconic series of works. Picasso was nineteen at the time, and had found no real artistic style. This dejected sense of self, as well as the deplorable conditions witnessed in his…

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Why is Shakespeare Important?

Why is Shakespeare Important? Staying Power Shakespeare is one of those reads you first encountered young, and you likely hated the experience. Syntactically, Shakespeare is a nightmare (to thine own self, be true). The plays themselves are short, but incredibly dense. They are filled with language that has fallen out of use or changed dramatically…

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Fingerprints

Fingerprints: A History DNA Unless you belong to one of four extended families who has adermatoglyphia, you have a unique and unmistakable set of fingerprints. They are formed at the early developmental stages of pregnancy between the deep layers of the skin by buckling pressures. These manifest as ridges you can see on the surface…

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March of the Mill Children

March of the Mill Children Children Marching in the Streets? Children marching from state to state isn’t a common sight today, but in 1903, it was. Child labor laws were unbelievably lax in the early 20th century (and before!), especially in textile mills. In fact, the 1900 US census reported that 1 in 6 children…

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Amelia Earhart: A Flying Legend

Amelia Earhart: Flying Legend “The most effective way to do it, is to do it.” Beginnings Amelia Earhart, born in 1897, was an American pilot and pioneer in women’s aviation. After serving in the Red Cross in World War I, she attended Columbia University as a pre-med; with financial constraints stemming from her family inheritance,…

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Malcolm X: Ballot or Bullet

Malcolm X: Ballot or Bullet “You can’t separate peace from freedom because no one can be at peace unless he has his freedom.” Beginnings Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, started a troubled and difficult life in 1925 Omaha. His family was the subject of significant racial harassment by the KKK and other hate groups, and…

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