Bring Your Own Device

Cell Phones in School

Should cell phones be banned or allowed in schools?

It’s no secret that the world of education technology and cell phone use in schools is changing the face of education. What are the advantages of students who bring their own devices to the classroom? Interested in cell phones in schools and a way to map out phone storage space? Let's take a look.

 

Should Cell Phones be Allowed in Schools?

Smartphones not only save an organization money by not having to fund and provide their own devices, but it also offers personalized learning. Students are able to complete work at their own pace, without having to adhere to a uniform homework plan that doesn’t cover the areas students are struggling in. This is especially convenient as personalized learning apps like FactSumo can be used anywhere, anytime. No more will students have to compromise their comfort or convenience to complete their assignments on time. Plus, organizations can spend more on network speeds instead of wasting money on seldom-used computer labs and other expensive technology and equipment.

 

Student Cell Phones and Phone Storage

Now that you’ve gone BYOD, what is there left to do? Well, you’ll likely run into questions from concerned students about something very important: space. The average smartphone comes with around 64GB of free space to use as one wishes. It’s vital for an organization implementing BYOD to set a policy regarding the use of space. For example, FactSumo takes up about 0.5 GB of space on a smartphone, or around 2% of a 32GB phone. With an influx of apps flooding the app stores, it’s important to set boundaries on what education apps should and should not be downloaded. Even leveraging a fair 5% of student phone space is a fair compromise. What’s most pertinent is setting guidelines so as to reduce confusion in the classroom. Teachers are best armed with the knowledge of the organization, and we here at FactSumo make it easy to know what student smartphone space is going towards.

 

Interested? Check out more at FactSumo.com!